Somewhere over the rainbow

That's where you'll find Mia

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So how do you think you've changed since high school?
Well I became aware of oppressive power structures and how we are complicit in them and now seek to dismantle them.
...
I also think I got hotter.
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thepropertyfiles:

HOME FOR A MAD MAN

We’ve all seen it: an A list actor or celebrity who has splurged out on a gargantuan mansion, hired an interior designer, and ‘blinged it up’ by several notches. Whenever I see the headline ‘Celebrity Home for Sale’, I’ll admit there’s a part of me that wants to check it out for nosiness sake - let’s face it, most of us are fascinated by how the ‘other half’ live - but the other part of me shies away from being reminded that money really doesn’t buy taste. Not even close.

Which is why I loved this house the moment I laid eyes on it, when it was featured in Dwell last year with these gorgeous photos by Joe Pugliese. And it’s why this compact, super-styled home marks the return of International Fridays this week as the property is now for sale.

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simulated:

Comme des Garcons Spring 2005 X Prada Spring 2008

(via espill)

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estrellavega:

Just completed my latest carousel book. All silkscreen printed, cut , glued and bound by hand. It takes me 2.5 hours to build one book, and I printed enough pages for 30 books, so I’ve got a lot of work to do.

The subject is black and white ruffed lemurs and habitat loss. The pop-up nature of the book makes it hard to see the background, but I assure you I drew a fire and burned out trees.

(via scientificillustration)

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aleyma:

Dragonfly helmet, made in Japan in the 17th century (source).

High-ranking lords began to embellish their helmets with sculptural forms so that they could be visually located on the battlefield. Exotic helmets (kawari kabuto) also allowed leaders to choose symbolic motifs for their helmets that reflected some aspect of their personality or that of their collective battalions. This helmet is shaped like a giant dragonfly. In Japan, the dragonfly is symbolic of focused endeavor and vigilance because of its manner of moving up, down and sideways while continuing to face forward. In addition, in ancient texts Japan was often referred to as Akitsushima (Land of the Dragonflies), because of their abundance. They were also thought to be the spirits of rice, since they are often to be found hovering above the flooded rice fields. - from the Minneapolis Institute of Arts description

aleyma:

Dragonfly helmet, made in Japan in the 17th century (source).

High-ranking lords began to embellish their helmets with sculptural forms so that they could be visually located on the battlefield. Exotic helmets (kawari kabuto) also allowed leaders to choose symbolic motifs for their helmets that reflected some aspect of their personality or that of their collective battalions. This helmet is shaped like a giant dragonfly. In Japan, the dragonfly is symbolic of focused endeavor and vigilance because of its manner of moving up, down and sideways while continuing to face forward. In addition, in ancient texts Japan was often referred to as Akitsushima (Land of the Dragonflies), because of their abundance. They were also thought to be the spirits of rice, since they are often to be found hovering above the flooded rice fields. - from the Minneapolis Institute of Arts description

(via dendroica)